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Roundup January, 27 2010

Selectism | Around the Web

01. Christie’s Gucci Collector Website Launches

“Last fall we learned that Gucci collectors would soon have a new way to value and sell their objects. Christie’s and Gucci have partnered on a new website, Gucci Collector, where people can upload vintage items and get an appraisal. Christie’s and Gucci are both part of the luxury megagroup PPR. Christie’s provides, at no charge, auction estimates for vintage Gucci.” (luxist)

02. Exploration #5 – Listen In: Berlin (above)

“There are places you won’t find in a tourist’s guide. Underground bunkers and mysterious hilltop listening stations, built to intercept radio communications. Berlin’s abandoned relics from the days of espionage are everywhere, hidden in plain sight. We put our boots on and went exploring.” (palladium)

03. New Massive Attack – “Saturday Come Slow” (Feat. Damon Albarn)

“As reported time and again, Massive Attack’s forthcoming Heligoland features a monstrous cameo list with the occasional side dish of NSFW porn confessional. The track with Tunde is out there, and in step with Damon’s recently revealed Gorillaz jam comes this collab with the Bristol duo on “Saturday Come Slow.” It’s a Heligoland high water mark for Massive Attack’s restrained, pitch-perfect production and Damon’s weary, wrenching delivery.” (stereogum)

04. Roberto Rossellini’s  War Trilogy

“Roberto Rossellini is one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. And it was with his trilogy of films made during and after World War II—Rome Open City, Paisan, and Germany Year Zero—that he left his first transformative mark on cinema. With their stripped-down aesthetic, largely nonprofessional casts, and unorthodox approaches to storytelling, these intensely emotional works were international sensations and came to define the neorealist movement. Shot in battle-ravaged Italy and Germany, these three films are some of our most lasting, humane documents of devastated postwar Europe, containing universal images of both tragedy and hope.” (criterion)

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