“Gary Lichtenstein 35 Years of Screenprinting” at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

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No. 01 / 03
Browse Gallery

One of seven exhibitions set to open on June 27, 2010, at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Gary Lichtenstein 35 Years of Screenprinting showcases 48 prints by the Connecticut artist. The focus is on work produced since 2004, a snapshot, really, of Lichtenstein’s career. Also included are materials from the artist’s studio which help to explain his process – think drying rack, proofs, and more.

From the Aldrich -

Lichtenstein’s role as an artist in his own right has brought an innovative perspective to his craft. His innate ability as a colorist, together with his belief in spontaneity and acceptance of what others would consider accidents or mistakes, has defined his studio. Multiple trial proofs and color variations are the norm, and Lichtenstein has no concern about how many screens it will take to successfully resolve an image. It is not unusual for a print from his studio to have fifteen or twenty colors, and there are examples of prints with forty or more. In the past decade, Lichtenstein has also begun to experiment with unique, large-scale screenprints on canvas, blurring the boundary between painting and printmaking.

The exhibition closes on January 2, 2011. More examples of Lichtenstein’s prints follow.

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