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Roundup July, 27 2010

Selectism | Around the Web

01. Artist and Surfer as Best Buddies (Above)

“The exuberant three-gallery exhibition “Swell” is one of the Big Kahunas of the season’s group shows. Its requisite summertime theme is surfing, which runs wider and deeper than most, encompassing an array of visual material and several familiar characters, namely the American male as renegade and good buddy.” (NYT).

02. Street Value : Shopping, Planning, and Politics at Fulton Mall

“Street Value: Shopping, Planning, and Politics at Fulton Mall offers an in-depth look at one of Downtown Brooklyn’s longest redevelopment sagas. Once referred to as the “Fifth Avenue of Brooklyn,” Fulton Street was established in the 1880s following the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge and a nearby elevated rail line. This bustling shopping district, running from Flatbush Avenue to Borough Hall, has remained one of the most profitable and well-used thoroughfares in the city. Today Fulton Street’s hand-painted signage, custom jewelry and sneaker stores, and many transient vendors offer a rare sampling of independent commerce. Nevertheless, misunderstandings about race, class, and real estate have caused the street to be characterized as “blighted,” turning it into a testing ground for urban improvement schemes from the 1920s onward. Recently rezoned, Fulton Street is once again poised for big changes.” (PA Press).

03. Exhibitions NYC. Japan Fashion Now. The Museum at FIT.

“The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (MFIT) presents Japan Fashion Now, the first exhibition to explore contemporary Japanese fashion in all its radical creativity, from designer fashion to street style, including menswear.” (The Curated Object).

04. Early American Passover Haggadah Takes $86,100 At Kestenbaum Auction

“Kestenbaum & Company’s saleroom was filled-to-capacity as clients witnessed a singularly important item of Americana go under the hammer at the firm’s auction of fine Judaica on May 27. Consigned by Gratz College of Philadelphia, the first Passover Haggadah printed in America, New York, 1837, was part of the college’s library for almost a century. After spirited bidding, the text ultimately realized $86,100 against a presale estimate of $40/60,000.” (The Bee).

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